Glaucoma



 What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is an eye-related disease that damages your eye's optic nerve. It usually happens when fluid accumulates in the front part of your eye. That extra fluid increases the pressure in the eye, damaging the optic nerve. Risk factors:
  • Increasing age (>40 years)
  • Family history of glaucoma
  • High myopia, diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Previous eye injury
  • High intraocular pressure

Symptoms

Usually, Glaucoma has no symptoms in its early stages. As the disease progresses more blind spots develop in the peripheral view. Some early symptoms may include blurred vision, mild headaches or eye pain.
Treatment The good news is that with regular eye examination, early detection and treatment, vision can be preserved. Often, peripheral (side) vision is affected first, so the change in the vision may be small enough for the patient to notice. With time, if untreated, central (front) vision will also start getting affected. The goal of the treatment for Glaucoma is to prevent loss of vision as vision loss from Glaucoma is irreversible.

Treatment The good news is that with regular eye examination, early detection and treatment, vision can be preserved. Often, peripheral (side) vision is affected first, so the change in the vision may be small enough for the patient to notice. With time, if untreated, central (front) vision will also start getting affected. The goal of the treatment for Glaucoma is to prevent loss of vision as vision loss from Glaucoma is irreversible.